Monthly Archives: September 2013

INSIDE OUR RECIPE BOOK

How quickly fall has fallen upon us!  There’s no denying that fall is officially here, which means our recipe book rotates from bright summer salads & fresh, minty cocktails to robust, rustic bakes & savory, spicy brews.

This fall, make the Farmer’s Log your GO-TO for all of the best fall recipes, with our feature posts “INSIDE OUR RECIPE BOOK”.  Of course, each recipe is paired with Angry Sheep photos that capture the very essence of fall.  You can almost taste it!

One of many favorites…a French Apple Tart.

 

apples (207 of 1)

Ingredients
For the pastry:
2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon sugar
12 tablespoons (11/2 sticks) cold unsalted butter, diced
1/2 cup ice water
For the apples:
4 Granny Smith apples
1/2 cup sugar
4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) cold unsalted butter, small diced
1/2 cup apricot jelly or warm sieved apricot jam
2 tablespoons Calvados, rum, or water
Directions
For the pastry, place the flour, salt, and sugar in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel blade. Pulse for a few seconds to combine. Add the butter and pulse 10 to 12 times, until the butter is in small bits the size of peas. With the motor running, pour the ice water down the feed tube and pulse just until the dough starts to come together. Dump onto a floured board and knead quickly into a ball. Wrap in plastic and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper.

Roll the dough slightly larger than 10 by 14-inches. Using a ruler and a small knife, trim the edges. Place the dough on the prepared sheet pan and refrigerate while you prepare the apples.

Peel the apples and cut them in half through the stem. Remove the stems and cores with a sharp knife and a melon baler. Slice the apples crosswise in 1/4-inch thick slices. Place overlapping slices of apples diagonally down the middle of the tart and continue making diagonal rows on both sides of the first row until the pastry is covered with apple slices. (I tend not to use the apple ends in order to make the arrangement beautiful.) Sprinkle with the full 1/2 cup of sugar and dot with the butter.

Bake for 45 minutes to 1 hour, until the pastry is browned and the edges of the apples start to brown. Rotate the pan once during cooking. If the pastry puffs up in one area, cut a little slit with a knife to let the air out. Don’t worry! The apple juices will burn in the pan but the tart will be fine! When the tart’s done, heat the apricot jelly together with the Calvados and brush the apples and the pastry completely with the jelly mixture. Loosen the tart with a metal spatula so it doesn’t stick to the paper. Allow to cool and serve warm or at room temperature.

Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/french-apple-tart-recipe/index.html?oc=linkback

IT’S THAT FALL FEELING

Or is it all of the apple cider flavored goodies that fall brings that gets us giddy for that nip in the air??

Apple cider, apple donuts, apple pie, candy apples…need we go on??

We must share the wealth!  Here is our favorite Apple Cider Donut recipe along with the scrumptious photo by yours truly, Gary Tardiff.

Drooling!!!

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Ingredients
2 red apples, such as Cortland or McIntosh
2 1/2 cups apple cider
3 1/2 cups all-pourpose flour, plus more for dusting
4 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
3 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1 2/3 cups granulated sugar
3 tablespoons vegetable shortening
1 large egg plus 1 egg yolk
1/4 cup buttermilk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar
Vegetable oil, for frying
Directions
Core and coarsely chop the apples (do not peel). Combine with 1 1/2 cups cider in a medium saucepan over medium heat; cover and cook until softened, about 8 minutes. Uncover and continue cooking until the apples are tender and the cider is almost completely reduced, about 5 minutes. Puree with an immersion blender or in a food processor until smooth. Measure the sauce; you should have 1 cup. (Boil to reduce further, if necessary.) Let cool slightly.

Whisk the flour, baking powder, baking soda, 1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon, salt and nutmeg in a medium bowl.

Beat 2/3 cup granulated sugar and the shortening in another bowl with a mixer on medium speed until sandy. Beat in the egg and yolk, then gradually mix in the applesauce, scraping the bowl. Beat in half of the flour mixture, then the buttermilk and vanilla, and then the remaining flour mixture. Mix to make a sticky dough; do not overmix.

Scrape the dough onto a lightly floured sheet of parchment paper and pat into a 7-by-11-inch rectangle, about 1/2 inch thick. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 2 hours or overnight.

Meanwhile, make the glaze: Simmer the remaining 1 cup cider in a small saucepan over medium heat until reduced to 1/4 cup. Whisk in the confectioners’ sugar until smooth and glossy, then set aside. Mix the remaining 1 cup granulated sugar and 2 teaspoons cinnamon in a shallow bowl; set aside for the topping.

Heat 2 inches of vegetable oil in a large heavy-bottomed pot over medium-high heat until a deep-fry thermometer registers 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with paper towels. Cut the chilled dough into 12 rounds, using a floured 2 1/2- or 3-inch biscuit cutter, then cut out the middles with a 1-inch cutter (or use a doughnut cutter). Slip 2 or 3 doughnuts at a time into the hot oil and fry until golden brown, 1 to 2 minutes per side, adjusting the heat as needed. Transfer to the paper towels to drain.

Dip one side of each doughnut in the cider glaze, letting the excess drip off; dip just the glazed side in the cinnamon-sugar or roll all over in cinnamon-sugar, if desired. Serve warm.

Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchens/apple-cider-doughnuts-recipe/index.html?oc=linkback

SNEAK PEEK: A WORLDWIDE COLLABORATION

Food stylist Kelly Upson is hard at work prepping the next shot as Gary reviews all the deliciousness with one of our latest clients.

The clients traveled from Germany, the UK, New York & Seattle all to visit the Angry Bostonian Sheep.  This job was truly a meeting of international creative minds!

We can’t reveal the product just yet, but the second it is on shelves here in the US, you better believe we’ll be posting some scrumptious packaging.

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SO LONG SWEET SUMMER

It looks like this week may be summer’s final send off.

95 on Wednesday?!  We were drinking pumpkin beer and watching football yesterday, were we not?

In honor of one more week of heat & humidity, here is a thirst quenching lemonade recipe to go with Gary’s gorgeous photography…almost makes it feel like July all over again.

INGREDIENTS

1 3/4 cups of sugar

1 1/2 cups lemon juice

8 cups of water

HOW TO

  1. In a small saucepan, combine sugar and 1 cup water. Bring to boil and stir to dissolve sugar. Allow to cool to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate until chilled.
  2. Remove seeds from lemon juice, but leave pulp. In pitcher, stir together chilled syrup, lemon juice and remaining 7 cups water.

Lemonade LemonadeTray

LAURYN GETS SOME PRESS

ANGRY SHEEP’S own Lauryn Mandryk shares her thoughts on style in Racked’s Into It, where they chat with Boston’s movers, shakers, and candlestick makers (okay not really) about how style fits into their lives.

http://boston.racked.com/archives/2013/07/12/into-it-lauryn-joseph-mandryk-angry-sheep.php